lundi 1 août 2016

What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?

What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?
What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?

There is little time again, Cuba was more than the country of rationing of gastronomy. Then the withdrawal of Fidel Castro has had the effect of a revelation. political and economic reforms helping, culinary creation, long muzzled by the state, takes full advantage of this revival. The revolution of the furnaces is running. 

Culinary Revolution In Cuba


 Relegated to the back benches of the international culinary scene, the Cuban table was long deemed frugal or widely derided for its portioned, unique ham and cheese sandwiches insipid, its age-old chickens fried to the bone. Since the economic reforms of 2011 and the authorization of private restaurants (previously limited to 12 people) to expand and diversify, the picture changed completely. It is even a revolution. The formerly disgruntled passengers Cuban cuisine and consoled themselves with cigars and rum now feast on honey chicken, savory bechamel sauces and revisited versions of traditional Cuban dishes such as ropa vieja (spicy minced beef). Based on this trend, Havana and other cities full of new private restaurants experimenting with recipes and ingredients hitherto unpublished in the country. Finally freed from the yoke of rationing of the 1990s, Cuban leaders are now trying to fusion cuisine or pinkish cooking, also adorning their food menus like eggplant caviar. 

For a first visit and taste buds accustomed to the variety and abundance of food, there is nothing fantastic. But for those who knew Cuba in the early 2000s, the big surprise.

What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?
What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?

Cuban Food, Fruit Blend 5 Centuries 


Like music and architecture, Cuban cuisine is the result of various flavors, recipes and techniques passed by successive travelers came to the island from the time of Columbus and Diego Velázquez. A sort of bubbling pot of ingredients imported from Spain, Africa, France, the Taino culture and other Caribbean islands, that would have let simmer for five centuries. 

Taino, Cuban cuisine has retained native root vegetable of the island, yuca (cassava) and sweet potatoes, or fruits such as guava. The Spaniards bequeathed their penchant for pork, rice, spices, and cooking techniques. As for African slaves, they did discover in Cuba the different ways of cooking plantains and the congrí (rice and beans with spices prepared in one pot). Finally, Cuba shares with its island neighbors the inimitable taste of Caribbean cuisine that can be found in the sofrito, tomato sauce decorated with onions, 
pepper, garlic, bay leaves and cumin.

What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?
What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?

All these mixed flavors, these culinary traditions marinated for centuries gave what is now called the kitchen "Cuban", simple, generous, healthy, reasonably spicy (with cumin and oregano priority) while being very fragrant . The roast pork is the dish of choice, closely followed by the fried or roasted chicken, often raised sauces lemon or honey. The marine component is never far away, lobster, crab, shrimp, aguja (swordfish) and snapper (snapper) abound, as many marine flavors adored by Cubans. Rice priority accompanies all dishes, often associated with beans (black in the first course, red in the second)
 to make the Moors and Christians or congrí. Other dishes lighthouse: 
root vegetables, often accompanied by plantains, cooked in a thousand ways. 

In season, Cuban lawyers are a treat and lush tropical fruits. Casas particulares of the breakfast usually starts with traditional fruity straight - banana, papaya, mango, pineapple and guava. Of these five fruits, only guava and pineapple were present on the island before the arrival of the Spaniards. Bananas and mangoes are a colonial contribution 
from Asia, while papayas come from South America.

Do not leave Cuba without having tasted the national dish ropa vieja the , 
roast pork with all the trimmings , the picadillo ( ground beef with olives and capers ) 
the tostones ( plantains fried twice ) and Moors and Christians .

What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?
What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?

History Of Rum In Cuba 


In the middle of the nineteenth century, Cubans became the rum distillation of the pioneers in successfully transforming aguardiente, rough water spirits and unrefined used by sailors and pirates in the region in a "Ron Superior" soft and white used today in fancy cocktails such as the mojito and daiquiri. At the origin of this metamorphosis is the experiment conducted in 1862 by a Catalan, Don Facundo Bacardí Massó (1814-1886), in his "rum" in Santiago de Cuba (a former port warehouse), by macerating the excellent sugar cane produced in the region to distill and produce a new kind of old rum, delicate, fresh and fruity on the palate. It was an almost immediate success and quickly became synonymous Bacardí rum, now playing the Catalan family influence in the country's affairs until the arrival of Fidel Castro to power in the early 1960s Bacardí Dynasty and business then left Cuba to Bermuda, brand disappearing forever from the Cuban market. But the rum distillery founded by Don Facundo always produces the local Ron Caney famous "rum of the revolution", aged in old casks Bacardi.

What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?
What Foods Are Eaten In Cuba?

Another famous Cuban rum producers dynasty, slightly less successful than the first, the Arechabala fled Cuba in 1973 after the seizure by the Cuban revolutionary government of the family company Havana Club, founded a century ago by José Cárdenas to Arechabala . Today, Havana Club represents 40% of alcohol sales to Cuba.

 Besides the factory Ron Caney in Santiago and the Havana Club now located in Santa Cruz del Norte near Havana, Cuba has more than 100 rum distilleries. The locals will tell you most likely of Ron Santiago de Cuba, Ron Mulata (manufactured in Villa Clara) or Ron Varadero.

 Cuban rum is made from molasses, a residue from sugar cane refining. Its production in Cuba was supervised by generations of maestros romeros (rum masters), which must have at least 15 years of experience in the rum tasting. The color (brown, amber or white) and age (Nejo) characterizes rum. Good rum can be 3 years old as 14 years of age. If visitors have a preference for rum-based cocktails (always white rum), Cubans enjoy more brown and dry rum, served without ice, the purest flavor.


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